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Kamal Basadi closed upto May 15

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With the number of positive Covid cases increasing at an alarming rate in India, the ASI on Thursday decided to shut all its monuments, museums, and protected sites including the Kamal Basadi located in the Fort Belagavi till May 15 as a precautionary measure.

“Due to prevailing Covid situation, it has been decided to close all the centrally protected monuments/ sites and museums under Archaeological Survey of India with immediate effect and till 15 May 2021 or until further orders,” said the order issued by NK Pathak, director (monuments), ASI.

The ASI manages and protects 3,691 monuments including 143 are ticketed sites in the country. 

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Built in 1204 CE, the Kamal Basadi stands proudly within the premises of the Belagavi fort. It is part of three temples within the fort that survive today, built in later Chalukyan style. Its shikhara is in Kadamba Nagara style, making it a unique monument indeed. The monument is today maintained by the Archaeological Survey of India.

The Kamal Basadi, a Digambar Jain temple, was built by Bicchiraja, a minister in the court of Kartavirya IV, a Ratta king. Belagavi region is blessed with several temples built by the Rattas back then. The main deity is Bhagwan Neminath, seated in a Padmasan posture.

The original idol of the Basadi was moved from here during enemy attacks centuries ago and is now kept at the Chikka Basadi in the city. The current idol, which belongs to the 11th century, was found in a forest and predates the temple. The serene idol is flanked by a large Kalpavruskha (the mythical wish granting tree) carved in stone which is indeed rare. Figurines of mythical animals adorn the base of the Kalpavruksha.

A Navagraha Tirthankar idol is also placed inside the sanctum sanctorum, which is extremely rare. The Kamal Basadi is divided into three parts- the Mukhamatapa, Antaral and the Garbhgruha. The ceiling of the Mukhamantapa is adorned with an inverted lotus with its 72 petals (hence the name Kamal Basadi).

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